An Issue of Trust

A fragile necessity
To any connection
Be it person
Beast
Or ephemeral thought
One needs to trust
To feel safe and whole
It wards of darkness
And brings calm
To an internal storm of horror
We desperately depend
On the ones we trust
Bonds forged over time
Shared experiences
And loves
Delicately woven through years
To build a tapestry
That can be burned
By a single act

___________________________________________________________

Maybe I should put some mild context here.  It might come out on the blog or a person might notice it in comments or private chats, but I do have a lot of trust issues.  They’ve been there for a long time, but some recent events amplified them to the point where I have to be careful.  When trust is broken, it doesn’t only hurt the connection that it was built on.  The wronged party can become anxious and worried that it will happen again. It adds a darker tone to every relationship they hold at this time and walk into later. What to some might be a small transgression becomes a sign that another betrayal is happening. I think this is made worse by the Internet too because we don’t have voice tone, facial expressions, and body language here.  Trust issues can drive one to assume the worst and that creates what one fears.  Guess my point here is that people should always take a step back and see what drives another.  Is there a trauma that left a psychological scar, which has been inadvertently poked?

About Charles Yallowitz

Charles E. Yallowitz was born, raised, and educated in New York. Then he spent a few years in Florida, realized his fear of alligators, and moved back to the Empire State. When he isn't working hard on his epic fantasy stories, Charles can be found cooking or going on whatever adventure his son has planned for the day. 'Legends of Windemere' is his first series, but it certainly won't be his last.
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2 Responses to An Issue of Trust

  1. Super poem and advice about stepping back. The rule “think before talking (or writing)” is a good one.

    Like

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