Top of 2016 #6: Questions 3: Stuck in the Emotions

(Originally posted HERE.)

Anger from Inside Out

Anger from Inside Out

First, I’m pretty sure this guy runs the show in my head most of the time.  Occasionally, Sadness knocks him out of the way and you can tell what movie my son watches about once a week.  Obviously, ‘Mad Max: Fury Road’.

Anyway, there are times I write a powerful scene and it draws out emotions that I have trouble turning off.  For example, I’ve learned that I shouldn’t drive anywhere right after I write a car chase scene in Crossing Bedlam.  Going into public after a scene that involves crying characters and heartbreak isn’t helpful either.  All part of the job, I guess.

  1. Is there one emotion that you find yourself gravitating toward more than others?
  2. What tactic do you use to ‘reset’ your emotions after finishing a scene?
  3. Is there an emotion that you have trouble putting into your work?

About Charles Yallowitz

Charles E. Yallowitz was born, raised, and educated in New York. Then he spent a few years in Florida, realized his fear of alligators, and moved back to the Empire State. When he isn't working hard on his epic fantasy stories, Charles can be found cooking or going on whatever adventure his son has planned for the day. 'Legends of Windemere' is his first series, but it certainly won't be his last.
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19 Responses to Top of 2016 #6: Questions 3: Stuck in the Emotions

  1. How did I miss this one the first time? Must be before I started my “must reads” list to filter blogs down. I always struggle with whether to include something or not. Some things, like lust, are controversial and the modern mentality of boycot and assault make me think twice. I really stuck my neck out there with Jason Fogg’s addiction, and I don’t think everyone came around to him by the end. I knew it was a risk, but thought it might be safe in a short story.

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    • I’m actually surprised one of the ‘Questions 3’ got on there. They dropped off popularity-wise pretty quickly. Good point on the lust and controversy thing. Personally, I do it anyway because avoiding the darker emotions can create flat characters. I couldn’t see writing a character without at least the risk of them falling into one of the big emotional pits that reality has for humans.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Some of them are okay though. Rage, greed, etc. Change that to some kind of lust related thing, and you run a risk. I know you’ve killed the dog before, but that’s another shock point for some people. The first chapter of Playground was shocking to some, but it established the stakes. I even toned it down some before I published it.

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      • Good point. People will announce that they want stuff that pushes boundaries. Then they’ll flip out if you kill an animal, kill a child, or have anything sexual. Just can’t win some days.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. twixie13 says:

    1) Since I’ve successfully managed to give one of my main characters that same level of insecurity that I have, it tends to be way too easy to get into his head. Anytime he starts thinking of his issues with his father and being called “useless” and such, it tends to make me think of how much I don’t tend to like myself all that much and crap, and…yeah.

    2) Reset? Usually, I’ll give my dog some attention or draw or something. Maybe put that same character through some sort of hell for my own entertainment.

    3) Anything romantic tends to be difficult for me. I find myself trying too hard with it, as I don’t think it’d fit anything else in-story if anything love-related turned into “And then they…ugh, I don’t know…One of ’em grabbed the other one’s ass and romantic shit happened, I guess?”

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    • 1) Giving our own flaws to characters is such a double-edged sword. Easy to do, but it seems to set off some unexpected introspection. I get that with Luke and his desire for praise.

      2) Never thought about that last one.

      3) Romance seems to be a common rough patch. I have trouble with that because I fear it’ll go too far. Although that’s lust more than romance.

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  3. I’m going to stay with my original comment.
    Is there one emotion that you find yourself gravitating toward more than others? I am usually a pretty level person emotionally except if I’m writing a tense scene. Then I go into the zone and can try to feel how my characters feel.
    What tactic do you use to ‘reset’ your emotions after finishing a scene? I grab a big drink of water and leave the room. It’s the only thing that works. I used to try and go on to the next scene but found myself still thinking of what I wrote.
    Is there an emotion that you have trouble putting into your work? I have a problem with sorrow and insecurity. These are two things that I have programmed out of my life since growing up nearly consumed by them. It is troubling for me to go back into those emotions. I can do it but it carries a personal cost.

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  4. TanGental says:

    Is there one emotion that you find yourself gravitating toward more than others? Anger, then maybe guilt
    What tactic do you use to ‘reset’ your emotions after finishing a scene? You know I don’t think I’m conscious what I do; sometimes i just plough on, no reset required. I think the upbeat emotions, love, romance are the easiest for me to continue after; the down emotions above take their toll. Probably get up and eat cheese; that seems to be a default strategy if a break is required.
    Is there an emotion that you have trouble putting into your work? Love and sex always. Hate writing sex.

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    • 1) Anger seems to be a common one. I find it one of the top three to access when I’m writing.

      2) Food is a good one. I usually avoid other people for a 10-15 minutes to make sure the character is quiet too.

      3) Same here and that looks like a common answer.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. L. Marie says:

    1. Is there one emotion that you find yourself gravitating toward more than others?
    Probably anger. I’ve noticed more scenes where characters argue or generally seem irritated with each other.
    2. What tactic do you use to ‘reset’ your emotions after finishing a scene?
    There are some characters I have to leave alone for a while. Usually these are the characters who are considered the villains in the stories (though they don’t seem themselves that way). Their emotional mindset is pretty draining.
    3. Is there an emotion that you have trouble putting into your work?
    I have trouble with a character who feels more than one emotion—like a mixing bowl of emotions (sadness, anger, fear). Translating all of those emotions is challenging.

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    • 1). I wonder why anger is the most common answer. Is it really that easy to access? Are we all a few steps away from going Sith?

      2). I can see his villains are draining. I take solace in the mentality that they’re enjoying what they do. There’s a sense of glee to some of my villains.

      3). Conflicted character equals conflicted author?

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  6. Pingback: Sinbad and the War of the Furies 2016 | | YIFY

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