Questions 3: Building an Adventuring Party

Lord of the Rings/Monty Python

Doesn’t seem like it can be done in 3 Questions.  Well, not much more than the basics and flimsy on that level too.  Still, it’s the end of the week and I’m interested in leaving things up to the comments.  Maybe it can help people get over a writing hump in their own adventure story.  Maybe it can lead to a story.  Maybe it’ll just be fun for a bit.  Let’s see what happens.

  1. What do you think is the most important part of building an adventuring party?
  2. What is the one party role that you would never include?
  3. What is the one party role that you would want to be yourself?

About Charles Yallowitz

Charles E. Yallowitz was born, raised, and educated in New York. Then he spent a few years in Florida, realized his fear of alligators, and moved back to the Empire State. When he isn't working hard on his epic fantasy stories, Charles can be found cooking or going on whatever adventure his son has planned for the day. 'Legends of Windemere' is his first series, but it certainly won't be his last.
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16 Responses to Questions 3: Building an Adventuring Party

  1. Those are tough. I suppose I’d want my group to have a good adventure to tackle. I don’t think I have any limits as far as what I might include. A camp follower/washer woman might be fun. I wouldn’t want to be the red shirt.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. L. Marie says:

    1. What do you think is the most important part of building an adventuring party?
    Expertise. But I guess it depends on the plot. If you want conflict, you might not want a team that works too well together. I guess that’s why so many movies have an unskilled newbie in the party. (Looking at you, Jurassic Park and Jurassic World.)
    2. What is the one party role that you would never include?
    It’s hard to say which one I wouldn’t include. I haven’t written many stories that would involve this sort of party.
    3. What is the one party role that you would want to be yourself?
    Probably the archer or the bard. But I would still want weapons if I fulfilled the latter role. 😊

    Like

    • 1. The unskilled newbie works great as a vessel. They learn and explore along with the audience. You get to share in their growth. Makes me think of Hughie from The Boys.

      2. Had a feeling this was the really tough one.

      3. Funny how bards aren’t always given weapons. Rapiers are perfect for them. Really flashy.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I haven’t done an adventuring party but will take a crack at the answers anyway. The most important part of building an adventuring party would be to include enough characters with enough different personalities and skills to make it interesting. The one-party role that I would never include would be the religious zealot. Such a role could put a big damper on the whole thing. The one party role that I would want to be would be the pathfinder and navigator. I think it would be fun to chart the course.

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  4. > What do you think is the most important part of building an adventuring party?
    They all need a compelling reason to be there. Otherwise, they could storm off when things don’t go their way. Friendship, commitment to a cause, life long dreams… When we play D&D, “let’s get some treasure” can be enough of a reason, but for a novel or series you need more to bring them together and keep them together.

    > What is the one party role that you would never include?
    Any role that would be deeply opposed to the group’s goal. For example, if they’re going to steal an artifact, I would not include anyone who simply refused to steal. People with mixed motives or who might try to get the artifact for only themselves are ok. I mean I wouldn’t bring in a character that completely rejected the quest.

    > What is the one party role that you would want to be yourself?
    A mage of some sort.

    Like

    • 1. I wonder about the money and fame reason in a novel. I’ve read some stories where a character has that motivation. At least at first. It could be a nice jumping point, especially if they’re surrounded by more noble reasons. Kind of like Han Solo.

      2. Good point. A flat out anti character probably wouldn’t be there unless it was to sabotage.

      3. Magic is fun.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Victoria Zigler says:

    1. Diversity. If you have a variety of skills and personalities, your party can generally handle whatever’s thrown at them.
    2. There isn’t anything I’d never include, just party members I think work better for certain types of adventures, so if I was writing one myself I’d illiminate any that didn’t need to be there.
    3. When I’m roleplaying I generally go for some kind of magic-user, an archer, or a rogue. I’d like to give a bard a go one of these times though. Yeah, I know you’re talking about for a story, but it’s sort of the same thing, isn’t it? I mean, a roleplaying session is just a story that’s unfolding as you play, that people mostly don’t bother to write down.

    Like

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