Dabbling with Science Fiction?

Gandalf and Kenobi

Gandalf and Kenobi

C.S. Boyack asked the following:

“You’ve made a big splash in fantasy, and danced around with paranormal. Are you going to take on science fiction any time soon? You’ve talked about super heroes, but I believe they had ties to Windemere.”

There’s a lot of ground to cover on this one and it’s hard to tell where to start.  I’m going to begin with my little fear of attempting science fiction.  When I was younger, this genre was all over the place and very beloved.  I don’t see it as often as before these days and I wonder if part of it is because of us becoming too critical.  Make one wrong move in science fiction and you’ll get crucified online.  ‘That type of technology wouldn’t work because of this’, ‘I want more realism in my fiction’, and so on and so forth.  People take this genre very seriously and want it to have as many facts as possible.  Sometimes at the detriment of the fiction part, so it makes me pull back from the genre.

I still have the superheroes and alien bounty hunter though, so I’d never say never.  Yet, I think those have some cushions.  Superheroes have become their own subgenre at this point and get leeway.  Once you have a character flying and spitting fireballs from his nostrils, you can bend some other laws of physics a bit.  Not to mention you have a long history of magical heroes and technology heroes, so the genre acts like a bridge.  I could put them on Earth or keep them in Windemere with only the scenery and goon weapons changing.  The powers, mentalities, and adventures would stay the same.  As for the alien bounty hunter, I’d be in a different galaxy and could always say things work differently than on Earth.  Dragonball Z did this a lot with planets having different gravity levels.

There is the word ‘soon’ that I have to consider here.  Next year will be a lot of prep work while the last 3 Legends of Windemere books are published.  I’ll have Ichabod Brooks (fantasy) and another Dawn Addison (paranormal) story to put together too.  As far as bigger projects, I might outline and write 1-2 of the Dawn Fang series (vampires/fantasy), but still no science fiction.  Unless I’m forgetting something.  Well . . . there is that one, which I’m unsure of.  Let me do some research.  Be right back.

*worst elevator music ever recorded*

Nothing conclusive on dystopian stories, so Bedlam is in the middle.  It might be considered low level, simplistic science fiction since it works off an alternate reality that depends on technology instead of magic.  You have diseased animals, the Half-Deads, and bizarre civilizations that have grown out of the rubble.  All of them have some connection to reality, but stretch things a bit.  One could say I’m using this to dip a toe in the sci-fi water without dedicating myself to the genre.  It obviously isn’t fantasy or horror or paranormal, but it isn’t completely science fiction.  Again, my nervousness about entering such a highly criticized arena has me making excuses.  I’d say this is only my circle that does this, but I see it whenever I read comments under a sci-fi movie review.  Even Star Wars gets questioned in terms of realism . . . a movie with space wizards and laser swords gets criticized for being unrealistic.  No wonder I stay with dragons, casters, and orcs more than humans.

The thing to take away here is to never say never.  Will I try science fiction soon?  Probably not in the next year or two.  Maybe not for a while considering I have so much fantasy on my plate.  Most of the sci-fi I would do is superhero style, so it could be that I never go fully into the genre.  Then again, who knows if I’ll revive one of my older ideas because of a spark.  Gotta love these vague answers, but you never know.

About Charles Yallowitz

Charles E. Yallowitz was born, raised, and educated in New York. Then he spent a few years in Florida, realized his fear of alligators, and moved back to the Empire State. When he isn't working hard on his epic fantasy stories, Charles can be found cooking or going on whatever adventure his son has planned for the day. 'Legends of Windemere' is his first series, but it certainly won't be his last.
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63 Responses to Dabbling with Science Fiction?

  1. Reblogged this on Entertaining Stories and commented:
    Should Charles take on science fiction? He offers some compelling reasons. Stop over and chime in.

    Like

  2. N. N. Light says:

    Never say never, Charles. I know for a fact that Science Fiction Romance is huge right now and no one on the planet Earth could’ve ever predicted that. I know it can be daunting but if a story emerges from your mind, I’d say go for it. 🙂

    Like

  3. I’ve seen those commenters before, and I kind of ignore them (sorry). It makes for a fun debate on occasion, but when world building, I get to have it my way. If you take Star Wars for what it is, you tend to enjoy it more. It’s fun to debate whether it’s fantasy or science fiction, but not to the point of failing to enjoy it for what it is. George Lucas gets to have it his way too. I guess that puts me more in the SF as background category as opposed to the Hardcore SF folks who expect all these ideas to become reality one day.

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  4. PHS says:

    Reblogged this on Archer's Aim and commented:
    Excellent considerations for moving to another genre. However, I do see some writers doing well by focusing more on the story than the intricacies of technology. For me, I seem to have mainly fantasy ideas though I might be willing to dabble myself given time to research the science to some degree.

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    • Most of my ideas are fantasy too. The thing is that I see authors focus on story, but readers go for the science. Almost like each side has chosen only half of the genre to pay attention to.

      Liked by 1 person

      • PHS says:

        Agreed. Some people like hard science like with The Martian while others like Star Wars. I think many of us understand there are no fireball explosions in space – we just understand the message is that the ship just blew up. I can be entertained by either and like to read both.

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      • I’ve been more on a magic and supernatural kick these last few years. I think I remember a sci-fi show that had silent fights to be more realistic. Kind of boring after a bit. Guess some sacrifices need to be made for entertainment.

        Liked by 3 people

      • PHS says:

        Indeed they do…

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  5. I’m with you on a fear of writing science fiction. I saw a review where one addict tore the writer to shreds for thinks like “no shock waves in space.” OMG I would be killed given what I know about space.

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  6. “Make one wrong move in science fiction and you’ll get crucified online[…] People take this genre very seriously and want it to have as many facts as possible.”

    After ‘this book is full of grammer error i wish i would not have read it,’ accusations of scientific inaccuracy are probably among the most common FALSE complaints about science fiction novels. They’ll complain that you got some fact wrong (even if you didn’t) if you write fantasy, too. If you actually WANT to write science fiction, you can’t let risk of such complaints stop you from writing it.

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    • Good point on wanting to. Many think doing fantasy means I’ll do science fiction or have an interest. There are times I do, but they’re too fleeting to make much out of. Have to admit that I never saw much of the false ones. Though I shouldn’t be surprised.

      Like

  7. I think you’d be fine, as long as you don’t label/categorize your story as “hard” sci-fi.
    There are a few really obvious things that people get wrong, like having spaceships maneuver like aircraft/boats, or confusing galaxies and star systems, but I think a very small amount of thought/research would avoid those. If you’re doing space opera, authors usually just ignore things like differences in gravity or atmosphere on planets, and I don’t remember hearing any complaints. Readers (including myself) just want a story in an exotic location when they read space opera.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. twixie13 says:

    I say go for it. Some people would complain about inaccuracies, sure. Some complain just for the sake of complaining. And after reading enough of your work, I know that a sci-fi story by you would be an entertaining read.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. A definite maybe, then.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Go for it, Charles. In fact, with the new president taking over in the U.S., he will be surrounding himself with advisers that think science is fiction.

    Like

  11. speedyreader says:

    Great post. I love that sci first has branched out so much in the last decade.

    Like

  12. Chris-tuffer says:

    dude this is awesome! I was thinking of turning some of my drawings into animations, and this reminded me of that, thanks!

    Also, the lost? search page of my blog has a gif of your picture above! crazy

    Like

    • Love that gif. Very cool idea to turn drawings into animations. What kind of program does that require?

      Like

      • Chris-tuffer says:

        Haha! Thank you! If you type ‘gif’ in place of ‘www.’ while watching any youtube video that isn’t too long, you can make a gif out of anything. just be sure it looks like ‘gifyoutube’ when you do it.

        By this, it doesn’t really require a program, so you don’t have to download anything except for the gif itself!

        If you don’t want the gif on your computer, you can ask your media gallery to keep it by copying the url into your library, and then it will go there.

        fun part, you can make your own short video upload it to youtube, and then turn it into a gif!

        Like

      • Awesome. Thanks for the info.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Chris-tuffer says:

        Always!

        Like

  13. Science fiction is my favorite genre. And sometimes stuff is weird and implausible, but as long as it it a good story I think people are willing to use their imagination to full in the gaps. A lot of stuff isn’t possible yet or has its flaws in sci-fi. That’s why it’s fiction!

    Like

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