A Writer’s Guide to Firearms: before the Modern Age (continued)

Nicholas C. Rossis

This is the last post in this series by my good author friend, William R. Bartlett’s. It continues his discussion of all things firearms and deals with Flintlock weapons in particular. If you have missed the rest of this brilliant series on firearms, you can check it out here. As always, Bill includes some great tips on writing about older firearms and some common writing blunders. Enjoy and bookmark! 

A Writer’s Guide to Firearms by William R. Bartlett

Part 6 (cont’d): Firearms before the Modern Age

The Flintlock

Flintlock | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books An English gentleman circa 1750 with his flintlock muzzle-loading sporting rifle, in a painting by Thomas Gainsborough. Image: Wikipedia

Flintlock weapons reigned in battle for over two hundred years and are based on the long-known principle that flint striking steel causes a spark hot enough to start a fire.  The flintlock uses this spark to ignite the powder in the…

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About Charles Yallowitz

Charles E. Yallowitz was born, raised, and educated in New York. Then he spent a few years in Florida, realized his fear of alligators, and moved back to the Empire State. When he isn't working hard on his epic fantasy stories, Charles can be found cooking or going on whatever adventure his son has planned for the day. 'Legends of Windemere' is his first series, but it certainly won't be his last.
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2 Responses to A Writer’s Guide to Firearms: before the Modern Age (continued)

  1. Thank you, Charles! This kind of weapon is closer to fantasy than modern rifles, so I hope you can find something to help with your writing here 🙂

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