A Writer’s Guide to Firearms: Introduction

Some great information for authors who write modern tales with action.

Nicholas C. Rossis

A few weeks ago, I was talking to my author friend, William R. Bartlett, and we discussed the possibility of a guest post where he’d share his vast knowledge of firearms.Bill readily agreed and surprised me with a multi-part magnus opus that covers pretty much everything on the subject. This post contains part of his introduction to firearms. The next parts will be posted on a regular basis, as Bill prepares them. Enjoy and bookmark! 

A Writer’s Guide to Firearms by William R. Bartlett

Part 1: Introduction

Glock firearm | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's book A Glock. Image: Wikipedia

When Nicholas first offered me an opportunity to send a guest blog regarding firearms, I didn’t hesitate. Sure! Be happy to. Then, I sat down and began to go over things. Firearms have been around in one form or another since the Middle Ages, nigh on to a thousand years, and reams have been written on the topic…

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About Charles Yallowitz

Charles E. Yallowitz was born, raised, and educated in New York. Then he spent a few years in Florida, realized his fear of alligators, and moved back to the Empire State. When he isn't working hard on his epic fantasy stories, Charles can be found cooking or going on whatever adventure his son has planned for the day. 'Legends of Windemere' is his first series, but it certainly won't be his last.
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7 Responses to A Writer’s Guide to Firearms: Introduction

  1. mike2all says:

    Informative stuff. I admire your site and wonder if any of my work is suitable. ‘Clinging On’ my current short story may be of interest.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks for sharing, Charles 🙂

    Like

  3. I have bookmarked this page for reference, as I’m woefully ignorant of guns 🙂

    Like

    • Me too. Most of my stories are sword & sorcery, but it helps to have the info. The one real world series I have tends to be over the top, but I could always have a character mention these facts while doubting what they just saw.

      Like

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